Videos: Auditory Verbal

Daniel

Mother is conversing with 2-yr-old Daniel who was identified through Newborn Hearing Screening and diagnosed with a moderate to severe hearing loss. He has worn bilateral hearing aids since he was seven weeks old. Mother has placed herself behind her son (in close proximity to his hearing aid) and is expanding his language without providing any visual speech cues while looking through a book.

Daniel: Whe dat one?
Mother: Where is that one? You want to find it? Let’s find it!
Daniel: Whe butfly?
Mother: Where’s the butterfly? Okay… let’s find the butterfly.
Mother: There’s the butterfly!
Daniel: Da! Da!
Mother: Giraffe!
Mother: Do you want to put the butterfly on the butterfly?
Daniel: Yeah

 


 

Mecaden

Mother and Early Interventionist, Nancy McLawhorn, are  working with 14-month-old Mecaden who was diagnosed at birth, wore bilateral hearing aids, and received a cochlear implant at 11 months of age. Mother and Therapist are doing activities to help Mecaden learn to identify familiar children’s songs through listening alone. Without visual cues, Mecaden performs the hand motions for corresponding lyrics, often anticipating the next line. Mecaden is not looking at her mother for visual cues, she is listening to her mother. This demonstrates that Mecaden is developing auditory memory, recalling information she heard previously.

Mother:
5 little monkeys jumping on the bed!
One fell off and … bumped his head!
Momma called the doctor and the doctor said
“No more monkeys jumping on the bed!”

4 little monkeys jumping on the bed!
One fell off and … bumped his head!
Momma called the doctor and the doctor said…
“No more monkeys jumping on the bed!”

Good girl!

Therapist:  Go down to 1 more…
Mother: Down just to 1?

Mother:
1 little monkey jumping on the bed!
He fell off and…

Therapist: Say it again…

Mother:
He fell off and… (laughing) bumped his head…
Momma called the doctor and the doctor said…
“No more monkeys jumping on the bed!”

 


 

Rachel

Family interacting with 5-yr-old daughter, Rachel, who was diagnosed with a severe to profound hearing loss at one month of age and has worn a cochlear implant since she was 10 months old. Rachel received her second cochlear implant at the age of 2/1/2 yrs. Here, Rachel is demonstrating advanced listening skills, communicating in a noisy environment  without the use of visual cues from her family.

Rachel: I put in tea and cream and sugar so it would taste wonderful!
Mother: It would taste wonderful… does it taste wonderful? Did you taste it yet?
Mother: What happened to my spoon?  Can I borrow a spoon?
Sister: Ahh… spoon? Yes!  You can have that one!
Mother: Thank you!
Sister:  Can I have that one?
Father: May I have some more sugar with my tea?
Rachel: Of course!
Mother: Sophie, are you finished stirring yours?”